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KALO/Taro
Curators: Dean Wilhelm, Hoʻokuaʻāina; Paul and Charlie Reppun; Solange Saxby, UH CTAHR
Taro farmers will present Moi kea (as well as other varieties of taro) grown in different locations in different styles of production.
Like many varieties of kalo, Moi kea is and was consumed often in the form of poi. Sour poi - that is poi left to ferment spontaneously with associated microorganisms - gives poi different flavors and health benefits. Sour poi of different ages will be available for tasting and research of the microbiology and health implications presented.
Moi kea is a hardy and productive taro variety, which is gaining popularity among taro farmers in Koʻolaupoko. It produces poi that is light in color - a brownish-white - and exhibits a super sweet taste when fresh. The variety has been cultivated by Chris Kobayashi and her partner Demi on Kauai, who shared the huli with Dean Willhelm of Kapalai Farm (Hoʻokuaʻāina), who has in turn gifted it to other taro farmers on Oʻahu. Growers are embracing Moi kea taro due to its general vigor and relative tolerance of Taro leaf blight (Phytophthora colocasiae), a disease that proliferates in warm, humid and still conditions.

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2019 Variety Showcase Oahu
KALO/Taro<br />
Curators: Dean Wilhelm, Hoʻokuaʻāina; Paul and Charlie Reppun; Solange Saxby, UH CTAHR<br />
Taro farmers will present Moi kea (as well as other varieties of taro) grown in different locations in different styles of production.<br />
Like many varieties of kalo, Moi kea is and was consumed often in the form of poi. Sour poi - that is poi left to ferment spontaneously with associated microorganisms - gives poi different flavors and health benefits. Sour poi of different ages will be available for tasting and research of the microbiology and health implications presented.<br />
Moi kea is a hardy and productive taro variety, which is gaining popularity among taro farmers in Koʻolaupoko. It produces poi that is light in color - a brownish-white - and exhibits a super sweet taste when fresh. The variety has been cultivated by Chris Kobayashi and her partner Demi on Kauai, who shared the huli with Dean Willhelm of Kapalai Farm (Hoʻokuaʻāina), who has in turn gifted it to other taro farmers on Oʻahu. Growers are embracing Moi kea taro due to its general vigor and relative tolerance of Taro leaf blight (Phytophthora colocasiae), a disease that proliferates in warm, humid and still conditions.